The House at Pooh Corner (1928)

The House at Pooh Corner (1928) concludes A A Milne’s stories about Winnie-the-Pooh, like Winnie-the-Pooh it was illustrated by E. H. Shepard. It introduces just one new character, Tigger, the irrepressible tiger.

The name fits the books as houses feature prominently, but the game of Pooh Sticks is also invented, and the book introduces the idea of growing up.

Shepherd's skill as an illustrator means that the pictures of Tigger are secondary to the words that create him.
Shepherd’s skill as an illustrator means that the pictures of Tigger are secondary to the words that create him.

Tigger is an interesting reminder of the brilliance of Milne’s characterisation, although those of us who discovered the real Pooh before we saw the disneyfied version love the drawings by E H Shepherd our memories of the characters usually owe more to the words than the pictures. Tigger, despite being a late-comer is known and loved, yet Shepherd’s Tigger is merely a tiger (see image right).

One thought on “The House at Pooh Corner (1928)”

  1. Awesome to hear Tim again. No wonder he caught our attention at College whenever he was lecturing. I think we were enjoying our childhood again listening as he spoke and recalled experiences throughout his life.

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